“What Shall I Tell My Savior”

"WHAT SHALL I TELL MY SAVIOR?"
"For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ; that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to what he hath done, whether it be good or bad" (2 Cor. 5.10)

     INTRO.: A song which focuses our attention on the fact that following the resurrection we shall all stand before the judgment seat of Christ to give answer for what we have done is "What Shall I Tell My Savior?" The text was written and the tune was composed both by Eugene D. Compton of Baytown, TX. The Feb. 21, 1974, issue of The Gospel Guardian announced that Compton had provided two additional stanzas for the well-known one-stanza song, "Lead Me to Some Soul Today." In 1995, I wrote brother Compton to ask him about these stanzas, and in his reply he sent me copies of another song, "What Shall I Tell My Savior?", copyrighted in 1976, which he said that he had produced not long after the additional stanzas to "Lead Me to Some Soul Today." Among hymnbooks published by brethren during the twentieth century for use in churches of Christ, it has not appeared and is not found in any to my knowledge.

     The song encourges us to act so as to give a good account of ourselves to the Lord.

I. Stanza 1 talks about the danger of following pleasure
"What shall I tell my Savior When we meet resurrection day,
If I’ve allowed my pleasure To darken and lead the way."
 A. When Jesus returns, all that are in the tombs shall be raised either to life or condemnation: Jn. 5.28-29
 B. As we prepare for this time, the Bible warns us against the dangers of pleasure: 2 Tim. 3.4
 C. The reason is that even innocent pleasures of life can choke out the influence of God’s word: Lk. 8.14

II. Stanza 2 talks about the danger of wasting time
"What have I done for Jesus In the time He has given me?
I’ve none to blame for failure; The pathway to life is free."
 A. God has given each one of us so much time that He wants us to use wisely: Eph. 5.15-16
 B. If we fail, we have no one else to blame but ourselves because each one of us will give account of himself to God: Rom. 14.12
 C. Of course, all of us fail in doing God’s will from time to time, but the pathway to life is free because Jesus paid the price for our sins by His death on the cross so that it might be possible for us to be free from sin: Rom. 5.15-18, 6.17-18

III. Stanza 3 talks about the danger of not considering the sacrifice of Christ
"He left His home in glory To go to the cross and die
That I might have salvation His Father to glorify."
 A. Jesus left His home in glory by coming to this earth in the flesh: Jn. 1.1, 14
 B. His purpose in this was to go to the cross and die: Phil. 2.5-8
 C. If we believe in Christ and accept the benefits of His sacrifice by obeying Him, we can have eternal salvation: Heb. 5.8-9

IV. Stanza 4 talks about the danger of not righting our wrongs
"I have now time to ‘righten’ most all of the wrongs I’ve done;
I’ve still a chance to brighten The pathway to life for one."
 A. As long as we are alive on this earth, we have time to do what is right: 2 Cor. 6.2
 B. The way that we "righten" the wrongs that we have done is by genuine repentance: 2 Cor. 7.10
 C. Then we should strive to help others and do good to the best of our ability: Gal. 6.10

     CONCL.: The chorus reminds us of the need to prepare for meeting the Savior.
"What shall I do? What shall I say, When we meet on that grand day?
What shall I tell my Savior? Oh, what shall I tell my Lord?"
As we journey in this life toward its end, judgment when we stand before the Lord, and eternity, we should constantly be examining ourselves and asking ourselves the question, "What Shall I Tell My Savior?"

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